BJÖRK COLLABORATES WITH APPORTABLE, BIOPHILIA APPS NOW AVAILABLE FOR ANDROID

In order to bring her Biophilia educational apps to a wider audience of students, educators and fans, Björk has collaborated with San Francisco-based Apportable to make the apps available for Android tablets and phones. Also available for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, the 10 Biophilia apps each correlate to a song on Björk’s multimedia album of the same name and serve as the cornerstone of the Biophilia Educational Program, which incorporates the apps in a series of interactive workshops to bring science and music instruction to students around the world. The apps will now be available as one combined download for Android tablets and phones for $12.99.

Download Biophilia in Google Play
Download Biophilia in Amazon Marketplace 

“The Biophilia Educational Program is a new way to teach children about science and music,” says Björk. “It has met with success in many cities, sparking interest from kids and educators from all over the world, from South America to East Asia to Africa. The most interest has come from students from low-income households and schools with underfunded art budgets, and the only way to bring the project to those people is to have Biophilia reprogrammed for Android and Windows 8.”

Apportable’s technology quickly transfers programs from Apple to Android platforms without extensive changes to the code. The company was founded in 2011 through the Y Combinator startup accelerator program and has since powered apps that have risen to the top of the charts and reached millions of users through the Google Play Store, Amazon Appstore, and the Humble Android Bundle. “We are honored that Björk has chosen Apportable’s technology to power Biophilia’s much-anticipated arrival on Android,” says Apportable’s CEO Collin Jackson. “Just as it broke new ground for interactive music apps with its original iOS release, Biophilia is breaking the boundaries of cross-platform mobile development as the first-ever Objective-C music app on Android.”

The apps are a central part of the Biophilia Educational Program, which began as a series of workshops Björk developed as part of her residency in Iceland. Björk collaborated with the University of Iceland and the City of Reykjavík to create interactive programming instructing students in the themes and natural phenomena that inspired her Biophilia album. She then brought the Biophilia Educational Program to New York middle school students during her residency at the New York Hall of Science in 2012, and also teamed up with the New York Public Library and the Children’s Museum of Manhattan to develop educational programming that ran in the city throughout last year. “It’s taught me that any sound can make music, and how much science and music is related,” described one student.

After traveling to Paris, Oslo, Buenos Aires, New York, Reykjavik, and Manchester, the workshops were held in Los Angeles and San Francisco this past month as part of Björk’s North American Biophilia tour. Reykjavik City’s Board of Education is currently running a mobile version of the Biophilia Educational Program in all of the city’s middle schools for the next three years.

For more information, please contact Carla Sacks or Krista Williams at Sacks & Co., 212.741.1000 or carla@sacksco.com or krista@sacksco.com.

 

Scott Snibbe was featured in a half-hour program on CNN’s The Next List, which profiles forward-looking thinkers in the fields of technology, science and social change.

Host Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and producer Tracy Dorsey brought her crew to Snibbe’s studio in San Francisco for a three-day shoot that resulted in an intimate and extensive portrait to discuss, among other projects, recent work with James Cameron’s interactive “Avatar” exhibition at the EMP Museum, Bjork’s breakthrough Biophilia App, and the future of interactivity.

Snibbe also wrote a blog posting for CNN you can read on their site: “Apps can help us fall in love with music again.

Biophilia was listed in Fast Company Design’s 14 Best Ideas in Interaction Design. We’re honored to be listed with Siri, Sifteo Cubes, and other things we admire from the year’s great minds! Our app OscilloScoop also made the list!

http://www.fastcodesign.com/1665704/14-of-the-years-best-ideas-in-interface-design#9

Biophilia is reviewed today on the cover of the New York Times as, “among the most creative, innovative and important new projects in popular culture.”

Playing the New Bjork Album, and Playing Along, With Apps, Seth Schiesel, New York Times, October 25, 2011

 

“Scott Snibbe talks Björk’s Biophilia, apps and interactive music
And why album apps could bring back the ‘falling in love’ stage for music fans”

The Guardian UK, Stuart Dredge, October 21, 2011

“Snibbe thinks that one of the downsides to the digitisation of music is that this falling in love stage has turned into a “casual relationship”, where people skip around albums, or listen to songs while walking, travelling and doing other things.

“You miss that falling in love period, and go immediately to the ‘brushing your teeth together in the bathroom phase’,” he said. “But an app can demand all of your senses and attention at once. That’s something exciting for musicians. A lot of them lament the demise of the album experience due to digital distribution. But one thing about the app-album is it reclaims people’s attention for an entire album.”

After fifteen months of development, and three months of teasing, Björk’s full Biophilia App Album is now available in the iTunes App Store – the world’s first App Album. Enjoy the six new apps: Thunderbolt, Sacrifice, Mutual Core, Hollow, Solstice, and Dark Matter, as well as the already-released Virus, Moon, and Crystalline.

There is some great press coverage today featuring Björk’s inimitable voice and words:

NPR Morning Edition: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’: Interactive Music, Pushing Boundaries
New York Post: “You Can Touch This
New York Times, Science Times Podcast: “A Science Lesson from the Singer Björk
CNN: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’ takes music to the app world
Wired Online: “Björk’s Biophilia App Album Launches 10 Beautifully Depicted Songs
The Wall Street Journal: “Bells, Whistles, Chimes and Charm
The Atlantic: “Bjork Talks About How Nature Inspired Her New, High-Tech Album
Huffington Post: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’ Apps: Is This The Model For The Future Of Music?

This is a fine time and place to list the large team that it took to put together this project including our truly fearless leader Björk; her brilliant designers M/M Paris; James Merry, Project Coordination and Research; Derek Birkett and Michele Anthony, Artist Management; Luc Barthelet, Drew Berry,  Stephen MalinowskiKodama Studios, Touch Press, John Simon Jr., Max Weisel, and Scott Snibbe Studio, lead app developers. The monumental full eight pages of credits can be found here.


A tour of Björk’s Biophilia


A 20 minute demonstration and talk on Biophilia by Scott Snibbe


Virus is now available in Björk’s Biophilia! The second app “single” tells the story of a cell attacked by a virus. You can protect the cell by thwarting the virus, but in order to hear the whole song, you must let the viruses win instead. Virus is a game you have to lose in order to win. Watch as viruses latch onto the cell, inject their DNA and reproduce themselves, all while Björk’s beautiful, cheeky love song progresses. The app is a unique combination of gaming, interactive art, music, and science, not quite recognizable as anything you’ve seen before.

Here’s a roundup of some recent press in the first week of its release:

With Biophilia, Björk Creates Album Art For The 21st Century (It’s An App!), John Pavlus, FastCompany Design, August 9, 2011

Björk’s New App Album Pushes Interactive Boundaries, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips, CBC News, August 9, 2011

The Making of Virus, Filip Visnjic, CreativeApplications.net, August 9, 2011

Björk’s infectious new tune comes as an educational biology app, Nature: Spoonful of Medicine, August 15, 2011

It looks like cover versions of Björk’s first Biophilia singles are proliferating – maybe due to the interactive musical scores in the Biophilia iPad app?

Björk guest edits the August 2011 issue of U.K.’s Dazed and Confused Magazine, with a fantastic interview with Björk: Violently Appy! The issue includes a spread on Scott Snibbe’s contributions, an interview with Stephen Malinowski, and much more.

There is a lot of press on Biophilia, but only a few sources with in-depth interviews with Björk explaining the whole project. Here are the best so far:

Björk Talks Biophilia, Brandon Stosuy, Stereogum, June 29, 2011

“I tried to have each song as emotionally different as possible. [The song] ‘DNA’ is about rhythm, but I also wanted it to be about the emotional, my relationship with my ancestors. That was just as important, to prove science nerds wrong, to unite the scientific and the emotional. ‘Moon’ is very melancholic and about rebirth and the lunar cycles but it’s also just about the math of a full moon. [I wanted the music to] weave seamlessly into science, a natural element, and musicology. Our times seem to be so much about redefining where we are physical and where we’re not. For me, it is really exciting to take the cutting edge technology and take it as far as it can get virtually, use it to describe/control the musicology or the behavior of raw natural elements, and then plug it with a sound source which is the most acoustic one there is — like gamelan and pipe organ. So you get the extremes: Very virtual and very physical. In that way you shift the physicality.”

The Science of Song, The Song of Science, Jon Pareles, New York Times, July 1, 2011

“‘I didn’t intend it to go so big,’ Bjork said with rueful pride in an interview before the performance. ‘It’s the way most complex project I’ve ever done. There’s been like 500,000 million e-mails and meetings.’ But from their beginnings, the songs on ‘Biophilia’ had a grand ambition: to unify music, nature (as described by science) and technology.”

How Björk’s ‘Biophilia’ album fuses music with iPad apps, Charlie Burton, Wired UK, August, 2011

“The app model is one she hopes to use long-term. ‘I have a feeling that for many years I won’t have to tear things up by the roots again. I can [release] songs in my own time and I have an iPad app I can write from,’ she says. For now, apps will also replace her music videos – and in the future she may stop producing physical CDs, to free herself from the production deadlines they involve.”

The Whole World In Her Hands: Björk Interviewed, Luke Turner, The Quietus, July 22, 2011

“Unlike so many of the new formats and futures of music we’ve been promised in the years since the business took a dive down the dumper, Biophilia genuinely does feel radical, futurist. Even more exciting, it feels as if Bjork isn’t just breaking new ground in music, but the world of apps too. It seems certain that Biophilia won’t, unlike many apps downloaded, be used only once. This is of course not to mention the educational aspect, something that emerges all the more strongly during our three hours sat in her living room, overlooking the North Atlantic, newspaper cuttings about the recent Grimsvotn eruption on the table. On the plane home a few hours later, I can’t help but think that Bjork reminds me of a 21st Century William Blake, a visionary fascinated by the potential of science and the wonder of the natural world, a master in the pioneering disciplines of the age.”

Björk on Biophilia and her Debt to UK Dance Music, Liam Allen, BBC News, July 28, 2011

“The abum was inspired by touchscreen devices which preceded the iPad, enabling musicians to play sounds by pressing the screen. ’Because I don’t play the piano or guitar, and usually I’ve always written my music when I am just walking outside, I’ve finally found something that’s appealing to me as an accompaniment,’ she says, ‘I can just scrabble with my fingers – it’s a breakthrough for me.’”