Posts Tagged ‘iPad’

REWORK_ first press from Fast Company, Wired, and Creators Project

Monday, December 17th, 2012

“Thanks to some obvious training wheels, it’s addictive to play with, and a pulsating visual delight to boot. Within about five seconds, you’ll be convinced you’re the next Philip Glass. “

—Fast Company Design: A Magical App For Exploring A Philip Glass Remix By Beck by Mark Wilson

“To accompany each track on the album, interactive design wunderkind Scott Snibbe, the man behind Björk’s Biophilia app album, created an iOS app that contains interactive visualizations for every track on REWORK_.”

—Creators Project: Exploring Scott Snibbe’s New App Album For Philip Glass’ _REWORK, Featuring Beck, Amon Tobin, Nosaj Thing, And More by Abdullah Saeed

“One has to admire the taut professionalism of a thing like this.”

—Wired.com, Rework (Philip Glass Remixed) app by Snibbe Studio by Bruce Sterling

 

Snibbe Studio releases REWORK_ App Album (Philip Glass Remixed)

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

We are enormously proud to announce REWORK_ (Philip Glass Remixed). This App Album takes the incredible remix album made in collaboration with Beck that was released last month, and gives it a feature-length interactive visual treatment.

REWORK_ features eleven “music visualizers” that take the remixed tracks and create interactive visuals that range from futuristic three-dimensional landscapes to shattered multicolored crystals, and vibrating sound waves. People can lean back and enjoy REWORK_ end to end, or they can touch and interact with the visualizers to create their own visual remixes.

In addition to the visualizers, the app includes the “Glass Machine” which lets people create music inspired by Philip Glass’ early work by simply sliding two discs around side-by-side, almost like turntables. People can select different instruments – from synthesizer to piano, and generate polyrhythmic counterpoints between the two melodies.

The REWORK_ app features interactive audiovisual mixes by critically acclaimed musicians and remix artists including Beck, Tyondai Braxton, Amon Tobin, Cornelius, Dan Deacon, Johann Johannsson, Nosaj Thing, Memory Tapes, Silver Alert, My Great Ghost, and Peter Broderick.

The app was directed by Scott Snibbe, produced by Ahna Girshick, and engineered by Graham McDermott, with music visualizer programming and design by software artist David Wicks. Lukas Girling designed the Glass Machine and Amon Tobin sequence. Many others helped to make this project come alive, including Philip Glass’ assistant Trevor Gureckis (My Great Ghost) who created miles of MIDI tracks and patiently explained Glass’ idioms at an 8th-grade level. See all the app credits below.

REWORK_ is available exclusively in the iTunes App Store, and is a universal app for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch.

BUY NOW IN ITUNES APP STORE: http://smarturl.it/rework

VIDEO: http://smarturl.it/reworkvideo

PRESS RELEASE: Philip-Glass-Snibbe-Press-Release-121312

COMPLETE PRESS KIT INCLUDING HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES

SCREENSHOTS AND ICON:

FULL APP CREDITS

Director Scott Snibbe

Producer Ahna Girshick

Executive Producer Hugo Vereker

Software Engineer Graham McDermott

Software Artist David Wicks

Interface Designer Pirate Vereker

Glass Machine Designer Lukas Girling

Visualizer choreography and design Rebecca Fenton, Lukas Girling, Ahna Girshick, Pete Hawkes, Sean Monroe, Graham Plumb, David Wicks

MIDI Sequencers Trevor Gureckis, Alex Weston, Fritz Myers

App Audio Engineers Lukas Girling and Noah Bennett Cunningham

Special thanks to Trevor Gureckis

© 2012 Scott Snibbe Studio

 

Passion Pit and Scott Snibbe Studio release Gossamer App with Exclusive “Carried Away” Interactive Video

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

The “Passion Pit: Gossamer” App is is a new interactive music app for iPad and iPhone released in conjunction with their new album Gossamer. We started with a project at the Webby Awards a couple months ago, doing a video backdrop to their new single “Take a Walk.”

Then we expanded the collaboration to an app “EP” featuring two songs, including a new track: “Carried Away.” Each song can be experienced in two modes – one is an interactive music video, where the sequencing of graphics, animation, and photographs by Mark Borthwick are different every time. And if you touch the screen you make your own unique music video.

The second mode for each song is a “remixer” in which people can create their own music with Passion Pit’s raw material. For “Take a Walk” people can create new melodies on top of a backing track, by creating a kind of harp-string spider web. In the remixer for “Carried Away” all the parts of the song can be turned on and off via touch tiles. Some loop, while others are synth notes. If you’re skilled enough you can actually play the song through, and I’m looking forward to seeing if anyone pulls it off and posts to YouTube.

The imagery for the app is all based on a bubble-like diagram that’s technically called a “Voronoi Diagram.” Snibbe learned about this pattern in college and it always fascinated him because it relates to everything from the structure of cells to the gravitational influence of stars. We chose it for this app because the first song, “Take a Walk” is about the financial bubble, and the hangover healing process coming out of it, so we thought this fragmented bubble imagery fit both metaphorically and psychologically.

High-resolution images can be found below.

For interviews and further information contact press@snibbestudio.com or +1 415 822 1442.

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbDpGssHdyw
App store link: http://snibbestudio.com/pp
App at Snibbe Studio web page: http://www.snibbestudio.com/apps/passionpit
Stills and app store information: http://snibbestudio.com/passionpit/Passion-Pit-1-0-materials.zip
Snibbe’s backdrop Passion Pit video at the Webby Awards: http://watch.webbyawards.com/webbyawards/index.jsp?content_id=21634821

icon:

iPad screenshots:

iPhone screenshots:

Scott Snibbe on CNN’s The Next List: the Future of Interactivity

Sunday, April 22nd, 2012

Scott Snibbe was featured in a half-hour program on CNN’s The Next List, which profiles forward-looking thinkers in the fields of technology, science and social change.

Host Dr. Sanjay Gupta, and producer Tracy Dorsey brought her crew to Snibbe’s studio in San Francisco for a three-day shoot that resulted in an intimate and extensive portrait to discuss, among other projects, recent work with James Cameron’s interactive “Avatar” exhibition at the EMP Museum, Bjork’s breakthrough Biophilia App, and the future of interactivity.

Snibbe also wrote a blog posting for CNN you can read on their site: “Apps can help us fall in love with music again.

MotionPhone HD Press: FastCoDesign and CreativeApplications.net

Friday, January 27th, 2012

FastCoDesign: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1668901/after-17-years-scott-snibbe-resurrects-animated-art-project-as-ipad-app

CreativeApplications.net: http://www.creativeapplications.net/ipad/motion-phone-ipad/

MotionPhone released for iPad and iPhone

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

MotionPhone App Enables a new Form of Visual Communication

San Francisco, April 19, 2012

MotionPhone, a new app for the iPhone and iPad, enables a unique form of visual communication, allowing people to create animations together on iPads and iPhones. The app, created by Scott Snibbe Studio, is the company’s first release since producing Björk’s groundbreaking Biophilia App Album last year, and is a similarly innovative combination of interactive visuals with music.

In MotionPhone, fingers’ movements become colorful dancing abstract shapes whose personality comes directly from the way one moves. “Each person moves differently and naturally creates their own original style of animation.” said Scott Snibbe, the app’s creator, “Each of our movements are as original and recognizable as our face or the way we walk, and with MotionPhone, it’s the first time we get to see these traces of movement.”

As its name suggests, MotionPhone is more than an animation program. Using Apple’s Game Kit technology, the app lets two people connect to each other over local networks to have a ‘visual conversation,’ creating animation together on an infinite two-dimensional plane. The resulting collaborative animations, reminiscent of 1980s animated music videos, or experimental films from the 1930s, can be cacophonous or sublime. Snibbe calls the process ‘Visual Music’ and with the networking component, ‘Visual Jamming.”

The app was originally an interactive artwork that Snibbe says evolved from his days in college studying animation and computer science. Working late in research labs while listening to classic jazz albums like Mingus Ah Um, he created a networked animation program that allows people to improvise animation in the same way that jazz artists improvise music.

The program eventually found the attention of art curators in the 1990s, winning a Prix Ars Electronica prize—sometimes referred to as the ‘Academy Awards’ of interactive art. However, Snibbe always wanted MotionPhone to be distributed widely, at a low cost, so that the program could be enjoyed by everyone. As Snibbe notes, “Now apps like Motion Phone can be sold for the cost of a video rental, instead of the price of a car.”

MotionPhone takes the same social gaming technology that lets you play Scrabble with your friends—Apple’s Game Kit—and uses the system for collaborative play and communication, much like parlor games of the 19th century. Snibbe believes MotionPhone, despite being almost twenty years old, is the first commercially available networked animation program.

MotionPhone can be found in the iTunes App Store and is available for $2.99 as an ‘HD’ iPad version and $1.99 for the iPhone version.

Buy MotionPhone for iPhone in iTunes App Store
Buy MotionPhone HD for iPad in iTunes App Store

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2OVn4fUHPs

Screenshots and icon:


Tripolar, commissioned by the Whitney Museum, released today for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch

Sunday, January 22nd, 2012

Tripolar, an interactive iPhone and iPad app by artist Scott Snibbe, is now officially released in conjunction with the Whitney Museum. It is one of the first artworks commissioned by a major museum to appear as an app for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Tripolar was commissioned by the Whitney Museum of American Art for the CODeDOC Exhibition curated by Christiane Paul.

About Tripolar

Tripolar animates the tangled, abstract, ever-changing forms a pendulum makes as it swings over a base of three magnets, tracing the path it follows when released from the point you touch. The drawing that results is a chaotic system in which minute changes to the start position produce large changes in the pendulum’s path. By invisibly moving the starting position in microscopic increments towards your finger’s position,Tripolar lets you explore the points between pixels, simulating a resolution thousands of times that of the screen.

Tripolar was commissioned for CODeDOC, an online exhibition curated by Christiane Paul in 2002 for the Whitney Museum’s Artport website that explored the relationship between a software artist’s code and the resulting work of art. The original Java source code demonstrates that changing any of the few parameters determining its operation radically alters the work: in most cases making it non-functional, hanging, exploding, imploding, or oscillating.

Tripolar’s name suggests the connection between mental states and chaotic phenomena: if even a simple physical system is so unpredictable and sensitive to initial conditions, what about our minds? Chaos and complexity reign at all scales.

To further explore the boundary between a software artist’s work and the interactive creations made with “users” of the work, the iPhone and iPad versions of Tripolar allows you to move, add, and remove magnets to create an infinite array of configurations besides the original Tripolar configuration. Once you make a change the the original artist’s configuration, the title of the work changes from Tripolar to Untitled, marking this boundary even more clearly.

To read more, visit: CODeDOCWhitney’s Artportsnibbe.com, and Tripolar on snibbe.com. © 2002-2012 Scott Sona Snibbe.

Screenshots for iPad and iPhone, and app icons:

The Full Björk Biophilia App Album is Now Available

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

After fifteen months of development, and three months of teasing, Björk’s full Biophilia App Album is now available in the iTunes App Store – the world’s first App Album. Enjoy the six new apps: Thunderbolt, Sacrifice, Mutual Core, Hollow, Solstice, and Dark Matter, as well as the already-released Virus, Moon, and Crystalline.

There is some great press coverage today featuring Björk’s inimitable voice and words:

NPR Morning Edition: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’: Interactive Music, Pushing Boundaries
New York Post: “You Can Touch This
New York Times, Science Times Podcast: “A Science Lesson from the Singer Björk
CNN: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’ takes music to the app world
Wired Online: “Björk’s Biophilia App Album Launches 10 Beautifully Depicted Songs
The Wall Street Journal: “Bells, Whistles, Chimes and Charm
The Atlantic: “Bjork Talks About How Nature Inspired Her New, High-Tech Album
Huffington Post: “Bjork’s ‘Biophilia’ Apps: Is This The Model For The Future Of Music?

This is a fine time and place to list the large team that it took to put together this project including our truly fearless leader Björk; her brilliant designers M/M Paris; James Merry, Project Coordination and Research; Derek Birkett and Michele Anthony, Artist Management; Luc Barthelet, Drew Berry,  Stephen MalinowskiKodama Studios, Touch Press, John Simon Jr., Max Weisel, and Scott Snibbe Studio, lead app developers. The monumental full eight pages of credits can be found here.


A tour of Björk’s Biophilia


A 20 minute demonstration and talk on Biophilia by Scott Snibbe


Recent Press with the release of Virus: FastCompany, Nature, CreativeApplications.net and more…

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Virus is now available in Björk’s Biophilia! The second app “single” tells the story of a cell attacked by a virus. You can protect the cell by thwarting the virus, but in order to hear the whole song, you must let the viruses win instead. Virus is a game you have to lose in order to win. Watch as viruses latch onto the cell, inject their DNA and reproduce themselves, all while Björk’s beautiful, cheeky love song progresses. The app is a unique combination of gaming, interactive art, music, and science, not quite recognizable as anything you’ve seen before.

Here’s a roundup of some recent press in the first week of its release:

With Biophilia, Björk Creates Album Art For The 21st Century (It’s An App!), John Pavlus, FastCompany Design, August 9, 2011

Björk’s New App Album Pushes Interactive Boundaries, Chris Chang-Yen Phillips, CBC News, August 9, 2011

The Making of Virus, Filip Visnjic, CreativeApplications.net, August 9, 2011

Björk’s infectious new tune comes as an educational biology app, Nature: Spoonful of Medicine, August 15, 2011

Björk guest edits Dazed & Confused

Friday, August 5th, 2011

Björk guest edits the August 2011 issue of U.K.’s Dazed and Confused Magazine, with a fantastic interview with Björk: Violently Appy! The issue includes a spread on Scott Snibbe’s contributions, an interview with Stephen Malinowski, and much more.