Posts Tagged ‘screenshots’

Snibbe Studio releases REWORK_ App Album (Philip Glass Remixed)

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

We are enormously proud to announce REWORK_ (Philip Glass Remixed). This App Album takes the incredible remix album made in collaboration with Beck that was released last month, and gives it a feature-length interactive visual treatment.

REWORK_ features eleven “music visualizers” that take the remixed tracks and create interactive visuals that range from futuristic three-dimensional landscapes to shattered multicolored crystals, and vibrating sound waves. People can lean back and enjoy REWORK_ end to end, or they can touch and interact with the visualizers to create their own visual remixes.

In addition to the visualizers, the app includes the “Glass Machine” which lets people create music inspired by Philip Glass’ early work by simply sliding two discs around side-by-side, almost like turntables. People can select different instruments – from synthesizer to piano, and generate polyrhythmic counterpoints between the two melodies.

The REWORK_ app features interactive audiovisual mixes by critically acclaimed musicians and remix artists including Beck, Tyondai Braxton, Amon Tobin, Cornelius, Dan Deacon, Johann Johannsson, Nosaj Thing, Memory Tapes, Silver Alert, My Great Ghost, and Peter Broderick.

The app was directed by Scott Snibbe, produced by Ahna Girshick, and engineered by Graham McDermott, with music visualizer programming and design by software artist David Wicks. Lukas Girling designed the Glass Machine and Amon Tobin sequence. Many others helped to make this project come alive, including Philip Glass’ assistant Trevor Gureckis (My Great Ghost) who created miles of MIDI tracks and patiently explained Glass’ idioms at an 8th-grade level. See all the app credits below.

REWORK_ is available exclusively in the iTunes App Store, and is a universal app for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch.

BUY NOW IN ITUNES APP STORE: http://smarturl.it/rework

VIDEO: http://smarturl.it/reworkvideo

PRESS RELEASE: Philip-Glass-Snibbe-Press-Release-121312

COMPLETE PRESS KIT INCLUDING HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES

SCREENSHOTS AND ICON:

FULL APP CREDITS

Director Scott Snibbe

Producer Ahna Girshick

Executive Producer Hugo Vereker

Software Engineer Graham McDermott

Software Artist David Wicks

Interface Designer Pirate Vereker

Glass Machine Designer Lukas Girling

Visualizer choreography and design Rebecca Fenton, Lukas Girling, Ahna Girshick, Pete Hawkes, Sean Monroe, Graham Plumb, David Wicks

MIDI Sequencers Trevor Gureckis, Alex Weston, Fritz Myers

App Audio Engineers Lukas Girling and Noah Bennett Cunningham

Special thanks to Trevor Gureckis

© 2012 Scott Snibbe Studio

 

MotionPhone released for iPad and iPhone

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

MotionPhone App Enables a new Form of Visual Communication

San Francisco, April 19, 2012

MotionPhone, a new app for the iPhone and iPad, enables a unique form of visual communication, allowing people to create animations together on iPads and iPhones. The app, created by Scott Snibbe Studio, is the company’s first release since producing Björk’s groundbreaking Biophilia App Album last year, and is a similarly innovative combination of interactive visuals with music.

In MotionPhone, fingers’ movements become colorful dancing abstract shapes whose personality comes directly from the way one moves. “Each person moves differently and naturally creates their own original style of animation.” said Scott Snibbe, the app’s creator, “Each of our movements are as original and recognizable as our face or the way we walk, and with MotionPhone, it’s the first time we get to see these traces of movement.”

As its name suggests, MotionPhone is more than an animation program. Using Apple’s Game Kit technology, the app lets two people connect to each other over local networks to have a ‘visual conversation,’ creating animation together on an infinite two-dimensional plane. The resulting collaborative animations, reminiscent of 1980s animated music videos, or experimental films from the 1930s, can be cacophonous or sublime. Snibbe calls the process ‘Visual Music’ and with the networking component, ‘Visual Jamming.”

The app was originally an interactive artwork that Snibbe says evolved from his days in college studying animation and computer science. Working late in research labs while listening to classic jazz albums like Mingus Ah Um, he created a networked animation program that allows people to improvise animation in the same way that jazz artists improvise music.

The program eventually found the attention of art curators in the 1990s, winning a Prix Ars Electronica prize—sometimes referred to as the ‘Academy Awards’ of interactive art. However, Snibbe always wanted MotionPhone to be distributed widely, at a low cost, so that the program could be enjoyed by everyone. As Snibbe notes, “Now apps like Motion Phone can be sold for the cost of a video rental, instead of the price of a car.”

MotionPhone takes the same social gaming technology that lets you play Scrabble with your friends—Apple’s Game Kit—and uses the system for collaborative play and communication, much like parlor games of the 19th century. Snibbe believes MotionPhone, despite being almost twenty years old, is the first commercially available networked animation program.

MotionPhone can be found in the iTunes App Store and is available for $2.99 as an ‘HD’ iPad version and $1.99 for the iPhone version.

Buy MotionPhone for iPhone in iTunes App Store
Buy MotionPhone HD for iPad in iTunes App Store

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2OVn4fUHPs

Screenshots and icon:


Tripolar, commissioned by the Whitney Museum, released today for iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch

Sunday, January 22nd, 2012

Tripolar, an interactive iPhone and iPad app by artist Scott Snibbe, is now officially released in conjunction with the Whitney Museum. It is one of the first artworks commissioned by a major museum to appear as an app for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. Tripolar was commissioned by the Whitney Museum of American Art for the CODeDOC Exhibition curated by Christiane Paul.

About Tripolar

Tripolar animates the tangled, abstract, ever-changing forms a pendulum makes as it swings over a base of three magnets, tracing the path it follows when released from the point you touch. The drawing that results is a chaotic system in which minute changes to the start position produce large changes in the pendulum’s path. By invisibly moving the starting position in microscopic increments towards your finger’s position,Tripolar lets you explore the points between pixels, simulating a resolution thousands of times that of the screen.

Tripolar was commissioned for CODeDOC, an online exhibition curated by Christiane Paul in 2002 for the Whitney Museum’s Artport website that explored the relationship between a software artist’s code and the resulting work of art. The original Java source code demonstrates that changing any of the few parameters determining its operation radically alters the work: in most cases making it non-functional, hanging, exploding, imploding, or oscillating.

Tripolar’s name suggests the connection between mental states and chaotic phenomena: if even a simple physical system is so unpredictable and sensitive to initial conditions, what about our minds? Chaos and complexity reign at all scales.

To further explore the boundary between a software artist’s work and the interactive creations made with “users” of the work, the iPhone and iPad versions of Tripolar allows you to move, add, and remove magnets to create an infinite array of configurations besides the original Tripolar configuration. Once you make a change the the original artist’s configuration, the title of the work changes from Tripolar to Untitled, marking this boundary even more clearly.

To read more, visit: CODeDOCWhitney’s Artportsnibbe.com, and Tripolar on snibbe.com. © 2002-2012 Scott Sona Snibbe.

Screenshots for iPad and iPhone, and app icons:

OscilloScoop released for iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Today OscilloScoop is released in the iTunes App store as a universal app for iOS devices. With OscilloScoop you make musical grooves by simply gliding your fingertips over spinning crowns; then sequence them into a real-time performance with a few taps. As effortless as a toy, OscilloScoop gives you the same tools pro DJs and electronic musicians use to create intricate grooves—but with an intuitive interface inspired by video games and animation.

OscilloScoop is designed by Lukas Girling, a creator of interactive musical interfaces who has worked with world-renowned musicians and music technologists including Laurie Anderson and Max Mathews. The app was created in collaboration with interactive artist and programmer Scott Snibbe, author of the bestselling apps Bubble Harp and Gravilux; and Graham McDermott, noted video game and app developer.

You can read a longer blog posting about Snibbe’s history with interactive music, including influences from John Cage and Brian Eno. Screen shots and press release can be found below.

OscilloScoop Press Kit
Press Release

OscilloScoop for iPad

OscilloScoop for iPhone

Oscilloscoop Icon (512x512)

Gravilux debuts in the new Mac App Store

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Gravilux, one of Apples Top Ten Art and Music Apps of 2010 for the iPad and iPhone debuts today, January 6, 2011, in a new version for the Mac, and one of the first apps available through Apple’s new Mac App Store. The Mac version features a “heads-up” interface that slides in from the bottom of the screen, providing immediate access to the controls for gravity, antigravity, color, number of stars, star size, and more. The Mac’s high-speed CPUs allow Gravilux to simulate hundreds of thousands of stars at once. If you have a Mac, download it now!

Press release link

Print resolution images in the gallery below:

Amazing Portraiture: Femme Noire

Friday, May 28th, 2010

Femme Noir: No. 2 by Ryl Mandus

Bubble Harp Self Portrait

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

Self-Portrait of the Artist by Ryl Mandus with Bubble Harp

Gravilux Heart

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

Gravilux Heart by Dustin Craig and Scott Snibbe